Development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and pink root (Pyrenochaeta terrestris) in commercial onion fields in relation to nutrition, pH, and soil fumigation
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Development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and pink root (Pyrenochaeta terrestris) in commercial onion fields in relation to nutrition, pH, and soil fumigation

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Onions -- Diseases and pests.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Anne-Cressey McGraw.
The Physical Object
Pagination[10], 66 leaves, bound :
Number of Pages66
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14230640M

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An arbuscular mycorrhiza (plural mycorrhizas, a.k.a. endomycorrhiza) is a type of mycorrhiza in which the symbiont fungus (AM fungi, or AMF) penetrates the cortical cells of the roots of a vascular plant forming arbuscules. (Not to be confused with ectomycorrhiza or ericoid mycorrhiza.). Arbuscular mycorrhizas are characterized by the formation of unique structures, .   ROOT ORGAN CULTURE medium that was relatively rich, especially in nitrogen, for isolating different vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from mycorrhizal strawberry roots and for reassociating them with tomato plants and excised roots of Allium cepu and Solunum by:   Introduction. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal is a “universal symbiosis” and the beneficial effects of these associations are well studied. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are obligate symbionts belonging to phylum Glomeromycota, which is currently comprised of around species distributed throughout the : James Dsouza. Maria J. Sainz, J. Arines, Effects of native vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate fertilizer on red clover growth in acid soils, The Journal of Agricultural Science, /S, , 1, (), ().

  Physiological Plant Patholo() 5, Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infections in root organ cultures BARBARA MOSSE and CHRISTINE HEPPER Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts., U.K. (Accepted for publication June ) Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infections, similar to those formed in plants with leaves, have been established for the first time in clover root . A new experimental procedure was developed to produce samples of leek roots containing early stages in colonization by vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. This procedure involved transplanting leek seedlings into a pot culture containing an established symbiosis. Abundant colonization of seedling roots occurred in 1 week. Sutarman Gafur, Contribution of Dynamics of Root Colonisation by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Communities to Ecosystem Function, Mycorrhizal Fungi: Use in Sustainable Agriculture and Land Restoration, /_3, (), (). There is disagreement about whether arbuscular mycorrhizas or vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas is the most appropriate name to use, because some fungi do not produce vesicles, arbuscules are not always present in roots and the role of arbuscules in nutrient exchange has not been confirmed (Smith , Walker ).

Sally E Smith, David J Read, in Mycorrhizal Symbiosis (Second Edition), Introduction. The development of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas involves a well coordinated sequence of events, during which morphogenetic changes to both fungus and plant take place, supporting the maintenance of a compatible, biotrophic symbiosis (see Chapter 2).This chapter will describe . Soil EC had very high correlation (r = , p vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal root . Most endomycorrhizae contain both vesicles and arbuscules and are, therefore, called vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizae (Fig. ). Endomycorrhizae are not surrounded by a dense fungal mantle but by a loose mycelial growth on the root surface from which hyphae and large pearl-covered zygospores or chlamydospores are produced underground. The effects of soil fumigation with methyl bromide ( kg/ha) on sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seedling height, root collar diameter, root morphology, vesicular‐arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) infection, soil‐borne spore number, and soil fertility were monitored from seeding in the nursery until ngs in nonfumigated soil had greater heights, root .